Posts Tagged critical environments

Webinar Recap: Oxygen Measurement in Safety Critical Applications

In case you missed months’s webinar with Siemens on oxygen measurement in safety critical applications, we’ve put together some of the key points:

What is a safety critical application?

A safety critical application is one in which system failure could result in loss of life, significant property damage, or harm to the environment.

There are a number of critical applications that anyone in the process industry should be aware of:

  1. Thermal oxidizers are process units for air pollution control in many chemical plants. They work by decomposing hazardous gases at a high temperature and releasing them safely into the atmosphere. When thermal oxidizers are not working properly, they can be explosion hazards.
  2. A gas flare is a combustion device used in plants for burning off flammable gas released by pressure relief valves during unplanned equipment overpressure. The oxygen level in the flare gas must be set below that of where an explosion could occur.
  3. Inert blanketing refers to the layer of gas, typically nitrogen, that lays atop contents in a tank, container, or silo to reduce oxygen content in the vapor space, and ultimately reduce the risk of unwanted combustion. If the inert blanketing fails, there is a possibility of explosion.

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The five ways particles are filtered from the air

Removing particles are often a key role to meeting certain indoor air quality and critical environment goals. This is particularly the case when dealing with clean rooms or hospitals. There are a number of different types of pollutant particles that can affect air quality; particulate matter and gaseous pollutants.

Particulate matter includes dust, smoke, pollen, animal dander, tobacco smoke, particles generated from combustion appliances such as cooking stoves, and particles associated with tiny organisms such as dust mites, molds, bacteria, and viruses.

Gaseous pollutants come from combustion processes. Sources include gas cooking stoves, vehicle exhaust, and tobacco smoke. They also come from building materials, furnishings, and the use of products such as adhesives, paints, varnishes, cleaning products, and pesticides.

While there are a number of ways to filter particles from the air, mechanical filters are the most common. They use fibers to catch particles as air is forced through an HVAC system. These filters catch particles in five possible ways:

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